Screentastic header
Tips & Tricks

Here you will find interesting items on a multitude of topics. A new entry will be posted weekly, if there is a topic you're interested in, please use the contact us form to let us know.
10 Ways to Boost Your Wi-Fi Signal
Written by: Fahmida Y. Rashid (PCMag)
Browsing slowing to a crawl, the inability to stream, dropped Wi-Fi signals, wireless dead zones-every one of these problems is maddening in a world where getting online has become, for some, as necessary as breathing. Well, maybe not that critical, but important. If the only way you can get decent reception is to be in the same room as your wireless router, these simple tips can help optimize your network.

Distance is the most obvious problem-there is a certain optimal range that the wireless signal can travel. If the network has to cover an area larger than the router is capable of transmitting to, or if there are lots of corners to go around and walls to penetrate, performance will take a hit. Interference is also a big issue, especially for those who live in densely populated areas. Signals from other wireless networks and electronics can impact speeds, as can physical obstructions, such as walls. Many phone systems and other wireless devices can also interfere with signals. This is a good thing to consider when you are shopping for a new phone system-many of them use DECT 6.0 nowadays, which coexists very nicely with standard Wi-Fi networks.

It's also possible the problem isn't interference or other networks. Is there a chance you have unwanted guests piggybacking on your network? You can always look at your router's administrator interface to see how many devices are connected. Or use a network analyzer tool to see if you have unknown machines on your network. If it's an open network, close it. Set up security-preferably WPA2, as WEP isn't as strong-and put in a strong password that's hard for others to guess.

To continue reading the rest of this article, please click here.

How to add a Hibernate option to the Windows 10 Start menu
Written by: Ian Paul (Contributor, PCWorld)
At the end of every day do you still dutifully close every file and program window before shutting down your PC? That's the standard way to handle things, but for quite a few versions of Windows, Microsoft also offered the ability to use Sleep and Hibernate modes instead of just a regular shut down.

In Windows 10, however, Microsoft decided not to include hibernate with the rest of the shut down options under Start > Power by default. The good news is it's easy to put the option back.

Why hibernate?

Hibernation is kind of a mix between a traditional shut down and sleep mode primarily designed for laptops. When you tell your PC to hibernate, it saves the current state of your PC-open programs and documents-to your hard disk and then turns off your PC. Then when it's time to start it up again all your previous work is ready and waiting for you.

To continue reading the rest of this article, please click here.

Google tracks everything you do: here's how to delete it
Written by: Becca Caddy (Wired)
It's no secret that Google knows a lot about you. It recently made headlines when the internet realised every time someone speaks to Google, it records their voice. And you can listen back to it. But that isn't the only bit of Google data that users with the right know-how can track down.

One of the more interesting places to check out what Google really knows about you is to head over to its ad settings page where (if you're signed into your Google account) you'll see a profile Google has built for you based on your search history, YouTube history and interests. So, for example, it might know that you're female, aged 18-24 and interested in banking, consumer electronics, mobile phones, shooter games, rap and hip hop and toys.

Google doesn't make a huge song and dance about its in-depth knowledge of its users, but at the same time it doesn't keep it a secret either. Here's how to find out what Google knows and take control of your data.

To continue reading the rest of this article, please click here.

The Complete Guide to Facebook Privacy Settings
Written by: Natasha Stokes (Techlicious)
Privacy concerns and privacy controls on Facebook are ever changing. When you post a picture of your kids at a family gathering, which one of your Facebook friends can share it? What private information are those Facebook game apps collecting on you for "third-party uses" ? How do you make sure that live video stream is seen only by people you choose? Every action you take on Facebook has privacy and sharing implications that need to be considered before you upload that next selfie.

Fortunately, thanks to vocal demands for transparency from both Facebook users and government regulators around the world, Facebook has been making the process of managing your privacy easier. Below is our step-by-step guide to taking full control of your Facebook privacy settings.

The basic privacy options

If you're not ready to dive into Facebook's substantial settings menu, there's a more user-friendly guide through the more vital privacy settings. By clicking the padlock symbol in the upper right of any Facebook page that you are logged into, you will get a dropdown window presenting you with walkthroughs of your current settings as they pertain to "Your Posts", "Your Apps" and "Your Profile".

To continue reading the rest of this article, please click here.

Entries from April 2017 can be found here.
Entries from May 2017 can be found here.
© 2017 Screentastic Computer Support Services